Infinity Engine (Transformation #3) (Polity) ★★★★☆

infinity (Custom)

This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

 
Title:      The Infinity Engine
Series:   Polity: Transformation #3
Author:  Neal Asher
Rating:   4 of 5 Stars
Genre:    SF
Pages:    575
Format:  Digital Edition

 

Synopsis:

The End Game is in sight. Penny Royal, that black AI that nobody can seem to predict, control or even understand, continues to move the players like chess pieces.

Prador and Humanity move together as the Atheter makes it clear that it won’t be kept on Masada. The Brockle is convinced that it is destined to take Penny Royal’s place. There are a lot of players, a lot of threads and Penny Royal weaves them altogether with a Black Hole.

And pretty much becomes a god and watches the end of the universe and it’s beginning and it tries to figure out how to stop the loop.

 

My Thoughts:

I thought this was the best of the trilogy. With various threads coming together, it is easier to understand what is actually going on. And the ending is the wry humor I expect from Asher.

The one thing I didn’t care for was Asher’s continued needling of religion. In several cases anyone who is religious is compared to a mentally ill person who obviously can’t think straight. I’ve also realized that Asher always makes any Separatists idiotic douchebags just to show how awesome it is to always bow to a greater central authority. I spit on that. He continually makes his point [with battle axe bluntness sometimes] about how powerful the Polity AI’s are and how much the humans really NEED them to run things. But this whole trilogy was about how poorly the AI’s DO handle things. They are not omniscient, all powerful beings. They’re just as flawed as their creators and even “self” improvement leads to problems half the time. So Asher pretty much argues against the case he makes in the first place. So phrack Central Authority. It’s called Responsibility.

The character that I liked the most this time around was Sverl, the prador turned AI with a golem body. How weird is that? But Sverl does a fantastic job of showing multiple points of view from one character, as he has aspects of Prador, AI and humanity, all rolled into one. I don’t know what it is, but something about him just appealed to me.

I think that for whatever Asher writes next, I am going to wait to read the whole thing instead of reading them as they come out. There was too much going on for me to remember everything from book to book and I know that lessened my overall enjoyment.

★★★★☆

bookstooge

 

  1. Dark Intelligence
  2. War Factory
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War Factory (Transformation #2) (Polity) 4….

War Factory - Neal AsherThis review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes.blogspot. wordpress.leafmarks.com & Bookstooge’s Reviews on the Road Facebook Group by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission.

 

 

 

 

Title: War Factory

Series: Transformation

Author: Neal Asher

Rating: 4 of 5 Stars

Genre: SFF

Pages: 472

Format: Kindle Digital Edition

 

Synopsis:

Penny Royal is now taking a more active approach. His next goal is the War Factory where he was created. Room 101. However, in getting there, he drags along a host of his past mistakes which he appears to be trying to fix.

One of those mistakes is Sverl, a prador who is turning into a prador/human/ai combo. Spear, from the previous book, is still along. Also tagging along is Captain Blite, who seems to be more of an observer than a mistake.

 

My Thoughts:

Sverl seemed to be the biggest character portrayed this time around. Satomi from the previous book is mentioned but that is it. Spear, Blite and some other humans all kind of blend into the “human” faction. We are also introduced to another AI, the Brockle, who seems to be heading towards the same path that Penny Royal once trod.

Convoluted is the term that comes to mind when I think of my time reading this book. Other Asher books have been complex and multilayered, but Penny Royal seems totally inscrutable and so a lot of what happens just seem random.  And speaking of convoluted, it helps your understanding of this book if you’ve read Asher’s book Cowl, in which he describes some the drawbacks of time travel. If you’ve not read it, you’ll just nod and accept.

It did not enhance my enjoyment of this book that at the same time I was reading this, all the chaos about Booklikes being sold [potentially] came out. I was distracted and not focusing on reading nearly so much. I KNOW that made this not as enjoyable as it could have been. It kind of pisses me off that a booksite related issue had a deleterious effect on my reading enjoyment. Kind of like a chef screaming in your face while you’re trying to enjoy a good dinner.

Dark Intelligence (Transformation #1) (Polity)

f5c20b1147913d15c73b181229ed7c8cThis review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes.blogspot.wordpress.leafmarks.com & Bookstooge’s Reviews on the Road Facebook Group by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission.

Title: Dark Intelligence

Series: Transformation, Polity

Author: Neal Asher

Rating: 4.5 of 5 Stars

Genre: SFF

Pages: 416

 

 

Synopsis:

Penny Royal, a rogue A.I. that went black after the Human/Prador war, is back. It should be dead.

One man and one woman, working with and against each other and Penny Royal, seek it out to find out what has happened.

But how do you fight an A.I. that can turn you into another creature or change your very memories?

That is what Spear and Satomi must figure out if they want answers to their questions and an end to their quest for vengeance against Penny Royal.

 

My Thoughts:

I love Neal Asher’s Polity books. Hard Technology [as opposed to High Fantasy] and ultra-violence all wrapped into a thrill ride where you don’t know which way is sideways or how you’ll get there.

I always know I’ll enjoy these books and hence tend to save them. But at some point I just have to start eating and then I enjoy every minute of it.

Even though the book is ostensibly about Penny Royal, everything is through the eyes of Spear and Satomi, both whom have been wacked by Penny in one way or another. So it starts out as a Quest for Vengeance type story but as you read along, both Spear and Satomi realize that things don’t quite add up. By the end of this book [it is supposed to be a trilogy] it appears that this story is a story of Redemption and making things right.  However, my experience with Asher leads me to believe that the convolutedness of this story is JUST beginning and that I still don’t have a clue as to the End Game.

I did knock off half a star for the 2 unnecessary sex scenes. They weren’t “explicit” but were graphic enough that I thought noting them was necessary.   I also added the “Ultra-Violent” tag, but to be honest, I had to stop and think about it. So I’m either getting jaded or Asher is getting mellow.

To end, a really fun book that continues my love affair with Asher’s Polity Universe.