Don Quixote: Part II: Chapters 17-22

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Up to page 638

Italics are what I penciled in the margins

The block quotes are quotes from the book.

Everything else are just my thoughts as I’m typing along here

 

 

 

Chapter 17

In which Quixote fights lions but they won’t fight him.

 

The History relates, that, when Don Quixote called out to Sancho to bring him his helmet, he was buying some curds of the shepherds; …

he knew not what to do with them, nor how to bestow them: andthat he might no lose them, now they were paid for, he bethought him of clapping them into his master’s helmet…

YES!!!

 

What can this mean, Sancho? methinks my skull is softening or my brains melting,

We knew this from the beginning.

 

Don Quixote only observed him (the lion) with attention, wishing he would leap out from the car, and grapple with him, that he might tear him in pieces; to such a pitch of extravagance had his unheard-of madness transported him.

To bad he didn’t get his wish. My bet would have been on the lion.

 

 

Chapter 18

In which Quixote visits a house and Poetry ensues.

 

 

Chapter 19

In which Quixote and Sancho meet some people who invite them to a wedding. Said people fight amongst themselves but stay friends.

 

Both the scholars and the countrymen fell into the same admiration, that all others did at the first sight of Don Quixote, and eagerly desired to know what man this was, so different in appearance from other men.

Doesn’t ANYBODY mind their own business?

 

…but nowadays that is little regarded; for riches are able to solder up abundance of flaws.

Ha, times haven’t changed a bit

 

The wife is not a commodity, which, when once bought, you can exchange, or swap, or return.

He who finds a wife finds a good thing and obtains favor from Jehovah. Proverbs 18:22

 

 

Chapter 20

In which they come to the wedding. Sancho stuffs his face and argues with Quixote.

 

The first thing that presented itself to Sancho’s  sight, was a whole bullock… round it were placed six pots…entire sheep were sunk and swallowed up in them… The hares…and the fowls…were without number…Sancho counted above three score skins, each of above twenty-four quarts….Cheeses ranged like bricks formed a kind of wall.

Sancho beheld all, considered all, and was in love with everything.

The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach.

 

‘Good, your worship, judge of your own chivalries,’ answered Sancho, ‘and meddle not with judging of other men’s fears or valours.

Too bad more people don’t take this advice

 

 

Chapter 21

In which a wedding trick is played

 

‘Hold a little, inconsiderate and hasty people!’

…all knew him to be the gallant Basilius…

‘Long live the rich Camacho with the ungrateful Quiteria;’…

…and so saying…and drawing out a short tuck…he threw himself upon it; and in an instant half the bloody point appeared at his back.

Now THAT’S how you ruin a wedding!

 

‘For one so much wounded,’ quoth Sancho Panza at this period,  ‘this young man talks a great deal.’

It’s a TRAP -Admiral Ackbar

 

‘and pray, consider, that love and war are exactly alike;’

“All is fair in love and war” IS NOT from Shakespeare. I never knew that.

 

 

Chapter 22

In which Quixote and Sancho pick up a guide and head to some guide. AFTER they’ve stayed with the newlyweds for 3 DAYS!!!

 

Don Quixote affirmed, it could not nor ought to be called deceit, which aims at virtuous ends…

The Ends do not justify the Means

 

‘I for my part am not married, nor have I yet ever thought of being so: yet would I venture to give my advice to anyone,’

The worst kind of advice giver

 

 

 

donquixotelion

Quixote and the Lion that wouldn’t Fight

 

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Shadow’s Edge: A Small Selection

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They closed on the young man, every one of them—even his brother—and began beating him.

It would have been faster if Garoth had let the squad wear gauntlets or use the butts of spears or the flat of blades, but he thought it was better this way. When the blood began flowing and spraying off flesh as it was pummeled, it shouldn’t get on the squad’s clothing. It should get on their skin. Let them feel the warmth of the young man’s blood as he died. Let them know the cost of cowardice. Khalidorans did not flee.

The squad attacked with gusto. The circle closed and screams rose. There was something intimate about naked meat slapping naked meat. The young man disappeared and all that could be seen was elbows rising and disappearing with every punch and feet being drawn back for new kicks. And moments later, blood. With the short straw, the young man had become their weakness. It was Khali’s decree. He was no longer brother or friend, he was all they had done wrong.

In two minutes, the young man was dead.

Shadow’s Edge, Page 14 by Brent Weeks

 

As much as I may talk a macho manly game, filled with violence and threats of ultimate destruction, the truth is that passages like the above still disturb me greatly.  I like Brent Weeks’ work, but between him and Neal Asher sometimes I wonder if I’m searing my conscience. Then I dive right back in and keep on reading.

 

bookstooge

Fathers and Sons: I’ve read 50%.

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I am thoroughly enjoying this.

 

I hate Bazarov though [I suspect we’re supposed to] and the following quote is a good example of why.

 

‘…moral diseases come from bad education, from all the nonsense people’s heads are stuffed with from childhood up, from the defective state of society; in short, reform society, and there will be no diseases.’

 

 

The young men have hared off to town and then to a country house where they meet a couple of nice women. Of course, nobody can be happy.

I have been feeling melancholic this month and the Russians do melancholy perfectly. I jokingly tell my wife that sometimes I can’t be happy unless I’m miserable. Maybe I have a stowaway russian soul 😀