Jeeves in the Offing (Jeeves Omnibus #4.2) ★★★☆½

jeevesintheoffing (Custom)This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: Jeeves in the Offing
Series: Jeeves Omnibus #4.2
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Humor
Pages: 200
Words: 41.7K

 

Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

An old friend Bertie went to preparatory school with, Reginald “Kipper” Herring, is staying with Bertie for a week. Bertie eagerly accepts an invitation from his aunt, Aunt Dahlia, to her home, Brinkley Court, since Jeeves is about to go to Herne Bay on holiday. Aunt Dahlia’s husband, Bertie’s Uncle Tom, is trying to make a business deal with an American named Homer Cream. While the two of them are in Harrogate, Mr. Cream’s wife Adela Cream, an author of mystery stories, and their son Wilbert Cream are staying at Brinkley Court. The mischievous Roberta “Bobbie” Wickham, and Aubrey Upjohn, who was once Bertie and Kipper’s oppressive headmaster, will also be there, along with Phyllis Mills. She is Upjohn’s stepdaughter and Aunt Dahlia’s goddaughter. Upjohn hopes to stand for a local election after giving a speech at the Market Snodsbury grammar school, and Phyllis is typing his speech.

Before going to Brinkley Court, Bertie learns that Kipper, who works for a weekly paper and is vengeful towards Upjohn, wrote a scathing, anonymous review of Upjohn’s recently published book. Jeeves tells Bertie that Willie Cream is a notorious troublemaking playboy known as “Broadway Willie”. After Jeeves leaves, Bertie sees a jarring announcement in The Times stating that he is engaged to Bobbie.

At Brinkley Court, Bertie finds Wilbert Cream reading poetry to Phyllis. He then finds Bobbie, who assures him that the engagement announcement was merely to scare her mother, who dislikes Bertie, into approving the man Bobbie really wants to marry, Reginald Herring.

While her regular butler Seppings is away on holiday, the psychiatrist Sir Roderick Glossop is working undercover for Aunt Dahlia as a butler named Swordfish. Upjohn is urging his daughter Phyllis to marry Wilbert. Aunt Dahlia does not approve of Willie’s reputation, so at her behest, Glossop is there to observe Wilbert’s behaviour. Bertie tries to keep Wilbert away from Phyllis. By letter, Jeeves informs Bertie that Willie Cream is a kleptomaniac. Uncle Tom’s silver cow-creamer goes missing.

While Bobbie is away, Kipper comes to Brinkley Court. He was engaged to Bobbie, but thinks it is over after seeing the marriage announcement for Bertie and Bobbie. He is relieved when Bertie tells him the announcement was fake. Glossop searches Wilbert Cream’s room for the cow-creamer, and bonds with Bertie. Bobbie ends her engagement to Kipper after reading an angry letter he wrote when he first saw the marriage announcement, and proclaims she will marry Bertie. Bertie does not want to marry her, but is prevented by his personal code from turning down any woman, so he drives to Herne Bay to get help from Jeeves. Jeeves agrees to return to Brinkley with Bertie. Bobbie soon forgives Kipper’s letter, but Kipper, to spite Bobbie, becomes engaged to Phyllis.

Aunt Dahlia tells Bertie that Wilbert Cream did not steal the cow-creamer. Uncle Tom sold it to him. Meanwhile, Upjohn intends to sue Kipper’s paper for libel. While his review was mostly legitimate, a small libellous portion was secretly added by Bobbie. Apologetic, Bobbie reconciles with Kipper. Glossop suggests that Kipper save his job by rescuing Upjohn from drowning. After Bertie and Bobbie fail to push Upjohn in the nearby lake, Bertie and Phyllis’s dog Poppet fall in instead. Kipper dives in to help Bertie, mistaking him for Upjohn, and Wilbert dives in to help Phyllis’s dog Poppet. Moved, Phyllis gets engaged to Wilbert. This initially upsets Aunt Dahlia, though it turns out that Wilbert is not actually the infamous Broadway Willie: that is his younger brother, Wilfred.

Upjohn becomes aware that Kipper wrote the scathing review and refuses to stay in the same house. Jeeves packs for Upjohn, neglecting to pack Upjohn’s typed speech. After receiving the typescript from Jeeves, Bobbie makes Upjohn withdraw his libel suit before she returns it to him.

Thinking Wilbert stole it, Glossop confiscated the cow-creamer. Adela Cream finds the cow-creamer in Glossop’s room and thinks he stole it. To prevent a misunderstanding, Glossop has revealed his true occupation. Following Jeeves’s advice, Glossop has claimed he had been brought to observe Bertie and had recovered the cow-creamer from Bertie’s room. Bertie is upset that the Cream family thinks he is a kleptomaniac, but Jeeves placates Bertie by saying that he has the satisfaction of helping his uncle. Bertie, remembering receiving gifts from Uncle Tom while at prep school, replies, “How right you are, Jeeves!”

My Thoughts:

By this time I have begun to realize that most stories about Jeeves and Wooster follow a loose pattern. Bertie gets ensnared into some imbroglio or other. He makes the situation worse by trying to solve it himself. He asks Jeeves for help. Jeeves apparently makes things worse but in the end reveals that that was just a part of his machinations and everything turns out according to plan.

Sure enough, this had most of those elements. Jeeves plays a VERY small part in this novel while Bertie tries to solve things on his own multiple times (usually he learns after one disastrous attempt) and of course, his attempts are huge failures.

In most of these stories by Wodehouse I tend to find at least one character very annoying. Sometimes it is Bertie Wooster, sometimes it is one of his friends, sometimes it is one of the love interests of his friends and sometimes it is the “villain” of the story. This time around it was the love interest Roberta “Bobby” Wickham. I wanted to take her over my knee and just paddle her for the absolute nonsense she spouted and completely idiotic actions she took. I considered knocking this down to a 3star just because of her, she really annoyed me that much.

Other than her, I enjoyed this quite a bit. I’d read this back in ’07 but honestly, I don’t remember reading it or any of the details so it was like I read it for the first time all over again. Apparently I also enjoyed it a lot more this time around, as last time I only gave it 2 stars. I’m guessing I had even less empathy for Bobby Wickham back then 😀

★★★☆½

 

bookstooge (Custom)

 

Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (Jeeves Omnibus #4.1) ★★★★☆

jeevesandthefeudalspirit (Custom)This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit
Series: Jeeves Omnibus #4.1
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: Humor
Pages: 304
Words: 49.3K

 

Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

Bertie has grown a moustache, which Jeeves disapproves of. G. D’Arcy “Stilton” Cheesewright, a fellow member at the Drones Club who has drawn Bertie’s name in the annual club darts sweep, becomes jealous when Cheesewright’s fiancée Florence Craye says she loves Bertie’s moustache. Florence and Bertie were engaged in the past, and Stilton mistakenly believes Bertie still loves her. Stilton is also jealous of Percy Gorringe, a playwright dramatizing Florence’s novel Spindrift.

Disappointed with Stilton after he refuses to grow a moustache, Florence asks Bertie to take her to a night club for research for her next novel. Hoping to talk her into returning to Stilton, Bertie agrees. However, the night club is raided. When Florence tries to run away, Bertie trips a policeman chasing her. Florence escapes and Bertie spends the night in jail before paying a fine of ten pounds. Shortly afterward, Florence and Stilton reconcile when Stilton agrees to grow a moustache.

At her home of Brinkley Court, Aunt Dahlia, Bertie’s aunt who runs a magazine called Milady’s Boudoir, is trying to sell the paper to the Liverpudlian newspaper magnate Mr. Trotter, who brought along his wife Mrs. Trotter and his stepson, Percy Gorringe. Aunt Dahlia has hired the successful novelist Daphne Dolores Morehead, who is staying at Brinkley, to write a serial for Milady’s Boudoir, to make the magazine appear successful to Mr. Trotter. Aunt Dahlia is also trying to win over Mr. Trotter with the magnificent cooking of her French chef, Anatole, though this does not seem to be working.

Florence has also gone to Brinkley Court. Aunt Dahlia tells Bertie to come to Brinkley to cheer up Percy, who is in love with Florence and upset that she is with Stilton. Stilton discovers that Florence and Bertie went to a night club together, and breaks his engagement to her by telegram. He comes to Brinkley Court, seeking revenge on Bertie, who avoids Stilton.

Bertie learns from Aunt Dahlia that she pawned the pearl necklace her husband Tom Travers bought her to pay for the new serial, without telling Tom. She is wearing a fake pearl necklace instead, and fears that Lord Sidcup, a jewellery expert who is coming to see Uncle Tom’s silver collection, will reveal the necklace as a fake. Jeeves suggests that Bertie act as a burglar and steal the fake necklace. Bertie attempts to do so but mistakenly enters Florence’s bedroom. She is moved to see him and assumes that he is in love with her. When Stilton comes to return her letters, Florence says she will marry Bertie, and Stilton, finding Bertie in Florence’s room, becomes aggressive. Bertie saves himself by reminding Stilton about the Drones Club darts sweep: hurting Bertie could cost Stilton fifty-six pounds and ten shillings. Uncle Tom locks Aunt Dahlia’s necklace in a safe. In addition, Lord Sidcup is revealed to be the recently elevated Roderick Spode.

After selling his Drones Club darts sweep ticket to Percy Gorringe, Stilton again threatens Bertie. Bertie tries, unsuccessfully, to fend off Stilton with a cosh, though Stilton forgets about Bertie and Florence when he sees Daphne Dolores Morehead and falls for her. Seeing Uncle Tom’s safe open, Bertie takes a pearl necklace he sees there. Next he talks to Aunt Dahlia, who says she took the fake necklace from the safe. The necklace Bertie took belongs to Mrs. Trotter. Bertie tries to put back the second necklace, but is unable to do so since Mr. Trotter shuts the safe door.

At breakfast, Aunt Dahlia’s butler Seppings presents Mrs. Trotter’s pearl necklace on a salver, stating that he found it in Jeeves’s room. Though Bertie prepares to confess stealing the necklace to save Jeeves, Jeeves says he planned to find the necklace’s owner, since he realized the pearls were fake and assumed the necklace belonged to a housemaid. Spode, or Lord Sidcup, confirms the pearls are fake. Percy admits that he pawned his mother’s real pearl necklace to produce the play based on Florence’s novel. Florence is touched, and she and Percy get engaged.

Mr. Trotter dislikes Anatole’s cooking. However, he feels much better after having one of Jeeves’s special drinks, and purchases Milady’s Boudoir. Grateful to Jeeves, Bertie agrees to shave off his moustache.

 

My Thoughts:

Much like authors, I am going to dedicate this review to someone. I’ve never understood why authors do that, because who cares? I’m doing it because I like poking people for the fun of it 😀 Back when I started this Jeeves series, or maybe even before, I talked with Irresponsible Reader on one of his posts and he really doesn’t like the humor of Wodehouse. I on the other hand absolutely LOVE the humor in these books. So, HC, here’s mud in your eye 😉

This was a full length novel but surprisingly, to me, I enjoyed the whole thing. It didn’t feel overly long or stretched out. The stupid-humor of Bertie Wooster never grated or came across as “too much”. So many mis-happenings and accidents just made me smile.

Now, I never did find myself laughing out loud, as I have in previous books, but I also never groaned. It felt very much like a “Classic Jeeves” story. Besides a short story collection, this felt like a high point.

★★★★☆

 

bookstooge (Custom)

 

Very Good, Jeeves (Jeeves Omnibus #3.3) ★★★★☆

verygoodjeeves (Custom)This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: Very Good, Jeeves
Series: Jeeves Omnibus #3.3
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: Humor
Pages: 273
Format: Digital Edition

 

Synopsis:

Another collection of short stories about Bertie Wooster and his fish-fed super-brainy man-servant, Jeeves.

Whether it is potential marital status change for Bertie (who seems to be afraid of said status), or a friend being forced to eat nothing but vegetables because of his wife’s friend, or an Aunt forcing Bertie to something he doesn’t want to (like pay off a waitress who Bertie’s Uncle George wants to marry), Bertie is always in a maelstrom of chaos. Thankfully, with Jeeves guiding the good ship Wooster, the apparently inevitable crash upon the rocks never happens and it is smooth sailing, until the next adventure.

 

My Thoughts:

The only complaint I have about short story collections is that it is wicked hard to synopsize each and every one. So as I’ve written before, and I’m sure you may have noticed, I simply don’t. Of course, I also have to complain about these omnibus editions, yet again. This book was the 3rd book published by Wodehouse and yet it is the 9th book in these collections. It also has no relationship in time to the previous book or two. What phracking idiot curated these anyway? I’d like to make them walk the plank, after I’ve tied them to the mast and given them a taste of the cat’o’nine tails!

Staying on the nautical theme, this was a boatload of fun. Captain Wodehouse excels in navigating the reader through a funny story that has a beginning, a middle and an end all within 10-40 pages. For the most part, Wodehouse’s humor tickles my fancy so even if the particulars of a story doesn’t really interest me, the humorous shenanigans do and that keeps me reading. I experienced no doldrums while on this pleasure cruise and what’s more, none of the offerings gave me food poisoning or led me to being sick.

Good times!

★★★★☆

 

bookstooge (Custom)