The Broken Eye (Lightbringer #3)

cover This review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes.blogspot.wordpress.leafmarks.tumblr.com by express permission of this reviewer

Title: The Broken Eye

Series: Lightbringer #3

Author: Brent Weeks

Rating: 4.5 of 5 Stars

Genre: SFF

Pages: 972

 

Synopsis:

Gavin loses his power, is kidnapped by pirates, loses his eye and comes back to the Chromeria.

Kip continues his duel with Andross and ends up fleeing the Chromeria with his ex-blackguard group.

Kariss becomes the next White in spite of Andross’s schemes.

The Color Prince uses Black Luxin and we find out that Gavin can use it at will, as the Lightbringer. We also find out what Black Luxin is capable of.

Lots of other things happen to lots of other people as well.

 

My Thoughts:

I no longer give out 5 Stars on an initial read. Those are saved for books that upon a re-read are just as good as the first time.

However, some books are so close that they deserve the 4.5 Stars. And this book deserves that.

I was worried going into this book, as I really enjoyed The Blinding Knife and was afraid my expectations might be a tad high. That is one thing I have found, my expectations can effect my reading quite a bit.

However, this was pretty solid for the first 75%. Good stuff. A great continuation of the story started in the previous two books.

Then things ramped up right until the end and I was left almost breathless. Intrigue, violence, battles, rescues, escapes, chases, corrupted magic users.

Books like this are why I like and continue to like, Fantasy. It makes me glad I bought this in hardcover. And a really good start to 2015. Booyah!

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The Blinding Knife (Lightbringer #2)

a02ccc84e0cdac5bacb42ee4617a4b3fThis review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes.blogspot.wordpress.com by express permission of this reviewer.

Synopsis

Kip must survive becoming a Blackguard while Gaven must survive losing his ability to command all 7 colors. All this while the Color Prince is bent on raising up the old gods of Color and destroying the mono-theism of the Chromeria.

My Thoughts

It took me almost 6 months to read this book. Not because it wasn’t good, but because I started this as my “gym” book, and well, my time at the gym has practically disappeared between one thing and another.

Once this series is done, I look forward to re-reading it in one gulp.

Kip is a fantastic character. He is the just the right amount of young hesitation, insecurity and doubt to make him feel real, but at the same time he has moments of genius, courage and heroics so that I can root for him and not feel like he’s a whiny douchebag.

Gaven & Daven. For all the time given to the imprisoned Gaven, and his torturous escape from the prison, I was thinking he was a bit more of a better man than he turned out to be. So when Daven simply killed him, after Gaven’s horrible revelation, it was a very weird feeling. I was glad he was dead, but then it felt like it was a buildup for no reason. And to be honest, Daven posing as Gaven still confused me at times with who did what as who, when, and why and… and I think you get the idea.

Weeks seems to be a very talented storyteller but the one thing that I pick is his use of “real world” profanity. I understand that people are going to curse, swear and generally profane the things that their world holds holy. So why do words like “shit” and “fuck” repeatedly occur? Those things would still be sworn by, but not those specific words. Kind of like in Battlestar Galactica, they use the word “phrack”. I find that to a weakness of Weeks’ [ha, get it?] and I’m  hoping that as he matures, he’ll go the route that Zahn or Sanderson has gone, ie, very light on the profanity and with “in world” words when used.

In the Night Angel Trilogy, I found the violence a bit disturbing, as a lot of it was directed at women and children. Thankfully, not nearly the same amount of time is given to it in this book, but it is still there, reminding us of just how bad this Lightbringer world can be.

Rating: 4 of 5 Stars

Author: Brent Weeks

Lightbringer #2

The Blinding Knife