The Architect of Aeons (Count to the Eschaton Sequence #4) ★★★☆ ½

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This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

 
Title: The Architect of Aeons
Series: Count to the Eschaton Sequence #4
Author: John Wright
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: SF
Pages: 397
Format: Digital Edition

 

Synopsis:

The Hyades emmissary makes it to earth. Since Montrose and Azarchel were both exiled to the outer limits of the Solar System, they couldn’t participate. They do come back, learn that the Hyades simply vacuumed up all the humanity they wanted and sent them to colonize uninhabitable planets.

Earth, the moon and Jupiter are all now planet brains. Montrose and Azarchel go their separate ways, do their separate thing, plot and counterplot until it is time for Rania to return. Passing thousands of years in sleep or otherwise, we see humanity change, morph, mature and just begin to take their place in the larger cosmos.

The book ends right before Rania is supposed to return. So there is at least one more book. Bugger that!

 

My Thoughts:

I enjoyed this much more than the previous book. The time skips become huge, sometimes 10’s of thousands of years. So I just wasn’t as invested in the story, hence it made it easier to just coast along.

Honestly, the whole “will Humanity be free or be slaves” thing going on between Montrose and Azarchel is getting a bit boring. You can only upgrade humanity so many times before it loses its “oomph”. And how come Montrose and Azarchel keep being smarter than even living planets? It doesn’t make sense, no matter how much Wright starts bringing in “alternate Monument data” and other such rubbish.

This is Empty Calorie Science Fiction. There is nothing wrong with it, as long as you know you are getting that. I was under the impression that this was the final book so I was a bit pissed off when I reached the end and bam, Rania hasn’t returned and there was still no resolution. But unlike the previous book, I wasn’t bored. So take from that what you will.

★★★☆ ½

bookstooge

  1. Count to a Trillion
  2. The Hermetic Millennia
  3. The Judge of Ages
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The Judge of Ages (Count to the Eschaton Sequence #3)

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This review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, & Librarything and links at Booklikes, Goodreads & GoRead by  Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

 

 

Title: The Judge of Ages
Series: Count to the Eschaton Sequence #3
Author: John Wright
Rating: 3 of 5 Stars
Genre: SFF
Pages: 381
Format: Kindle Digital edition

 

Synopsis: Spoiler

Picking up right where Book 2 left off, The Judge of Ages shows the final confrontation between Montrose and Del Exarchel and his flesh and blood counterpart. Of course, nothing is still as it seems,not even with Del Exarchel’s bombshell’s. Humanity 2.0 has arisen and they don’t like the post humans (Montrose and Del Exarchel) mucking around with them.

Ends with the 2 archenemies becoming frenemies and being exiled from Earth in a spaceship. And Jupiter is in the process of being turned into a giant brain. Seriously.

 

My Thoughts

First off, Irresponsible Reader asked for a “meh” book and I have to say, he’s getting it in spades with this one.

The only thing saving this from a 2star is the fact that there was a 50page battle in a locked room [it might have been slightly less than 50 pages, but it felt like it and that is a good thing] with about 10 different groups. It was awesome. It was up there with the battles in Neal Asher’s book and since I had just read Gridlinked, the comparison was fresh.

Both this and Gridlinked are dealing with Posthumanity and the future. Unfortunately, this book falls into a didactic tone and the characters, mainly Montrose, spend the majority of the time spelling out they outsmarted all the other characters and the results of their smarty-pants’ness. It is all explained with very big math’y words that lapse over into the social engineering side of things as well. If you happen to be an expert in that kind of thing, or enjoy that level of detail, this will probably work for you.

I don’t need that level of excruciating detail. I am not posthuman. In fact, most days, without an energy drink, I am barely old fashioned human. It was just boring!

At this point, I will keep reading the series just to see how it ends. But my goodness, shoot me in the head with a nanoencephalitic cocktail if you want me to praise future books.

star30full-custom

 

 

Review of Book 1

Review of Book 2

The Hermetic Millennia (Count to the Eschaton Sequence #2)

63716d82a70f4aa37481d2157185a01cTitle: The Hermetic Millennia

Series: Count to the Eschaton Sequence #2

Author: John Wright

Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars

Genre: SFF

Pages: 400

Format: Kindle digital edition

 

This review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes. blogspot.wordpress.com & librarything.com/catalog/BookstoogeLT by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission.

 

 

Synopsis:

The smartest man in the world goes to sleep so he can survive until his wife comes back. However, his enemies, the Hermeticists, wake him up every couple of hundred years by running amok.

In the main story, Montrose is taken captive and used as a translator as his captors search for the Judge of the Ages, ie, Montrose. Montrose learns everything he can so he can wreak his awful and terrible vengeance upon these interlopers, only to realize in the very end that as smart as he is, he can still be outsmarted.

Ends on a cliffhanger.

 

My Thoughts: Spoilers

I did not enjoy this as much as Count to a Trillion. Part of that was the dreamlike aspect of the sequence of time. It reminded me a lot of Wolfe’s The Wizard Knight with it’s asperger syndrome main character.  It was disconcerting to have chunks of time and events passed over and simply ignored, for no apparent reason.

The overview of humanity over 7000’ish years was really interesting. Each Hermeticist got their chance to create a humanity they thought were best. Each time Montrose was awakened and set forth events to combat their ideas, which led to the downfall of said race and the arising of a new. Finding out that he was being tricked each time to reveal a strand of super-duper-puper math was something else. While Montrose is the main character and you are kind of rooting for him, he’s still an arrogant jerk so the schadenfreude was strong in me.

Make no mistake about this though, this was humanistic to its core. As such it reflects the base values of such a system. There were also times where it just felt like the author was indulging himself a little too much in his own fancy.

The cliffhanger ending was not appreciated. That was the main reason I bumped this down 1/2 star. Anyone who had read both the books so far is definitely going to continue the series. To end it like that smacked of one book being artificially broken up.

star35full

Count to a Trillion (Count to the Eschaton Sequence #1)

Count to a Trillion - John C. WrightThis review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes. blogspot.wordpress.com by  Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission.

 

 

 

 

 

Title: Count to a Trillion

Series: Count to the Eschaton Sequence #1

Author: John Wright

Rating: 4 of 5 Stars

Genre: SFF

Pages: 464

Format: Kindle digital edition

 

Synopsis:

Menelaus Montrose grew wondering where The Future was. Where were the moon rockets and flying cars? So Menelaus joined the army, became a gunslinging lawyer, then a scientist, then an astronaut to decipher the greatest find of Humanity’s history.

But ol’ Menelaus just wasn’t smart enough, so he shot his brain with a concoction, went insane and then deciphered parts of the Artifact. Now that he’s woken back up, on Earth, it turns out that Humanity has 10,000 years to prepare for the coming of their new overlords, who are just a bitty little power in the Universe.

Menelaus has shown humanity that they can “improve” themselves. Now it is a race to see who can successfully repeat his experiment and determine whether Humanity will capitulate or fight in 10K years.

 

My Thoughts:

I thoroughly enjoyed this. The pacing was really odd and I had to keep pretty close track of when I was. I also found the amount of detail a tad overwhelming but I just sat back and let it roll over me. I think this was also trying to be Hard SF, with lots of references to various theorems, technical ideas on biology, mathematical sequences, blah, blah, blah. I just skipped them, as it felt more like “Science” name dropping than actual Hard SF.

Other than that, this was a great look at what “could” happen to humanity if they messed around with their own brains. Of course, it is all predicated that you believe that garbage can produce non-garbage 😉

I think Neal Asher does a better job of showing post-Humanity. But this series will fill in the gap while I wait for his next book.

Finally, I wish I knew why the series name was Count to the Eschaton Sequence.  But I don’t want to know enough to actually do any work and investigate it.