The Singer’s Crown

The Singer’s Crown

Elaine Isaak

Fantasy

1 Star

 

This novel had an interesting plotline. A king dies, his brother kills his heirs and wife but lets his fave nephew live, but castrates him and sends him to live with singing monks. The nephew comes back many years later and retakes his throne.

Ok, now the real review. This was a HORRIBLE book. By horrible, I mean I would gladly do physical violence to the author to prevent her from ever writing again. Why, you ask? Let me tell you. This lady either hates men, doesn’t understand them AT all OR has some insane desire for men to actually be women inside. ALL the male good characters are the most effeminate, emotional, wussy and plain cowardly wusses I have ever wanted to throttle and then run through. How many times can you read about men “…touched his shoulder and gazed into his eyes” without wanting to just totally puke it all up! And the thing is, it is not at all homosexual. It is just girly. Men acting like women, WRONGO!

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Memories of Ice (Malazan Book of the Fallen #3)

Memories of Ice

Malazan Book of the Fallen #3

Steven Erikson

4 Stars

 

taking place during and immediately after Deadhouse Gates. Paran is now Lord of the Decks [which recognizes “legitimate” gods]. Turns out that the Crippled god is actually an alien forced into our dimension 100’s of thousands of years ago and now he is trying to destroy everything here in revenge. He is playing a great game of war. This book deals with various factions putting down an army of his that is led by a Jaghut. Details alot more about the Imass and the Jaghuts in the far past. Has lots to do with the rise and fall of gods, ascendants and the like. It is incredibly sad. Yet the writing is SO incredible that whenever I read a fantasy book right after one of these, the fantasy book seems so shallow and 2d by comparison. Read this on my honeymoon, so that might have a tiny influence on why I enjoyed this so much ;D

Deadhouse Gates (Malazan Book of the Fallen #2)

Deadhouse Gates

Malazan Book of the Fallen #2

Steven Erikson

4 Stars

 

Oh man, where to start? I’m not really going into the plot, too many different threads, almost Dickensesque. I really enjoy this series. Erikson pays attention to detail, has a very fullbodied storyline and obviously has an overarching storyline.

First thing though, it all gets confusing. Creatures more powerful than gods. So many different kinds, names, etc, etc. It seems to be getting to the point where being a god is pointless because there are so many other things just as, if not more, powerful. Second, nobody is safe. Anybody can die. Of course, nobody is of the Heroic Cast, so you don’t really feel happy or sad about them.

Thirdly, this book seemed filled with the hopelessness of living in such a world. One characters sums it up as “smile, what else is there?” There really is no hope for characters. Even death isn’t always final, nor is it necessarily a release. Nor is god-hood a safety. There are things meant to simply deal with the powerful.

I wouldn’t want to live in this world, not at all! Erikson’s preference for Existentialism shows through, barely restrained.

Gardens of the Moon (Malazan Book of the Fallen #1)

Gardens of the Moon

Malazan Book of the Fallen #1

Steven Erikson

4 Stars

 

An empire of humans is trying to take over the world, the Malazan Empire. There are also a plethora of gods, old and new, several additional races [all of which seem to be old and dying out] and various types of magics. Complicated. The Empress, who ousted the Emperor 15-20 years before the book starts, seems bent on taking over all that she can while also wiping out those in the army who still respect the Emperor. Follows one company who is set for destruction, called the Bridgeburners. Some High Magical Lord of an Elder race who must face a resurrected Tyrant who ruled for close to 3 Millenia back in the day. Gods playing around with fate and it is all tied together, even if not directly. Complicated, confusing and very indepth. I still don’t feel like I have a grasp on everything that happened. I know that I missed stuff when I skimmed, but there was SO much that I couldn’t help but skim. Definitely looking forward to reading more though.

Empire of Ivory

Empire of Ivory

Temeraire #4

Naomi Novik

Fantasy

1 Star

 

dragons of England are all sick. Temeraire isn’t. They figure it must be something he ate in Africa on his journey back from China. Bunch of sick dragons go to Africa. Find a cure. Laurence and others are captured by a tribe of Africans and taken prisoner. The tribe of humans and dragons wipes out all European towns along the coast. Laurence and others escape to England. English infect rest of European dragons, now that they have a cure. Laurence and Temeraire go to France with the cure. Ends with Laurence and Temeraire preparing to head back to England to face court-martial for treason.

Ok, Novik is a history buff.It shows. Once again, the dragons are given very little character developement time. They are almost just a sideshow to allow Novik to probe into alternate history. I don’t care 2 bits about most of what goes on in the human society, I want dragons! And Novik insists of slogging through the human society and dragging us along.

 

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Classic

1 Star

 

A man tells a sordid tale about his neighbor and a cousin. The neighbor loved the cousin 5 years ago but left. She married someone else. Her husband cheats on her but is rich. The neighbor comes back rich [from bootleg(illegal liquor, this was in the 20’s) and other shady affairs] and tries to woo the cousin back. The husband gets his revenge by telling his mistress’s husband that the neighbor is actually the mistress’s lover. The neighbor tries to get the cousin to leave with him, she won’t. The mistress’s husband kills the neighbor after the mistress is run over and then kills himself.

Confused yet? This was a story about fallen humanity with no redeeming quality. Why it is a “classic” is beyond me. There is no redemption and there must be in all True Stories.