Rest in Peace: Patricia McKillip

Last week Jeroen informed me of Patricia McKillip’s death on May 6th of this year. Here’s an article from Tor.com:
World Fantasy Award Winner Patricia A. McKillip Has Passed Away

I am quite saddened by news of her passing. I had hopes that she would write several more of her absolutely gorgeous lyrical fairytale prose. I guess this means my re-reads will be all that more poignant knowing there will be no more. If you have not read any of her books, here’s a list of my many reviews as I gush over her books like I have for no other author. Gushing over an author, me. That’ll probably never happen again.

All of my Patricia McKillip Reviews

53 thoughts on “Rest in Peace: Patricia McKillip

    1. There are two schools of thought on that. Many people, who are not me, recommend starting with her Riddlemaster trilogy. It’s some of her early stuff.
      Personally, I started with The Book of Atrix Wolfe and also The Tower at Stony Wood. If none of those hook you, she’s not for you.

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      1. If it wasn’t for the egregious YA cover on the release and the whole “girl pwwr and feelings” from the publisher, I’d agree. But they tried to stuff McKillip into a box that didn’t fit and it didn’t make anyone happy.

        So I’ve not recommended that first, because first impressions can’t be taken back.

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          1. Here’s a link to the edition I was referring to on amazon. Look at the cover and read the blurb. It’s not inaccurate, but it puts a spin on things that I don’t believe is accurate:

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              1. hahahaaa, now isn’t that ironic?
                To me, everything about that edition screams YA. From the mysterious long haired girl to the wording of the blurb using all the catch phrases I see in other YA novels.

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                  1. I concur. But the issue is actually getting started. If I had seen that cover first and that blurb, I never would have touched McKillip with a 10ft pole. and I would be seriously missing out. I think Kinuko Craft and her covers for many of McKillip’s works were the best truth in advertising one could ask for.

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                    1. Yes, true, but covers or blurbs of older books hardly play a role in my choices, it’s all reviews from bloggers and a few other trustees. Now with new titles, it’s another story. Most new speculative fictions screams ‘stay away from me’ just because of the covers alone. It’s a great service publishers provide for my TBR 🙂

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                    2. That cover came out in 2017. And nothing on it says anything about it NOT being a modern tale.
                      And I would have assumed, like you do for “new” sf, that the cover shows what is on the inside.

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                    3. One at a time! My days of buying the entire back catalogue of an author I liked are over. As they say in Dutch: A donkey doesn’t hit himself on the same stone twice.

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    1. I am thankful to have discovered her back in ’05. Because if it weren’t for that accidental discovery, I’d never have found her. Nobody talks about her books online and she never got a hand onto the hype train.

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  1. It’s tragic to hear that you won’t be able to read new stuff from an author you so enjoyed. However, as a reader who struggles with ALL that there is to read out there, I think there’s a good side to this – you have a finite number of books to read if you want to check her work out. And, as you said – the re-reads will be all the better.

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      1. There are a few authors whose death would get to me, or already have. Sue Grafton — she wasn’t able to finish her alphabet series. Rudolfo Anaya — that just made me a different sad because I loved his magical storytelling so much.

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        1. I’ve never read Sue Grafton. The alphabet series always struck me as schmaltzy just based on the titles so I never tried her. What genre is it anyway?

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  2. I’m always saddened when a favorite author passes, knowing there will be no new books to look forward to. Unfortunately, in this case she passed before I ever tried any of her work, though I’ve long wanted to. I’ve had a copy of Winter Rose on my shelf for some time, and a few ebooks, so I have no excuse for not trying, other than time. Looking back at your reviews it appears she has quite a few books to her credit.

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  3. Hard-boiled detective. Grafton is such a good writer, down to the sentence and vocabulary. She’s also very descriptive and detail oriented, which I love. I love being drawn into a setting. I mean, they have solid plots, but that’s not why I used to read them. I’m really into book atmosphere. I guess that’s also why I love Rudolfo Anaya.

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