The Mystery of Edwin Drood ★★★★☆

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Title: The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Author: Charles Dickens
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: Classic
Pages: 249
Words: 94.5K



Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

The novel begins as John Jasper leaves a London opium den.[4] The next evening, Edwin Drood visits Jasper, who is the choirmaster at Cloisterham Cathedral and also his uncle. Edwin confides that he has misgivings about his betrothal to Rosa Bud, which had been previously arranged by their respective fathers. The next day, Edwin visits Rosa at the Nuns’ House, the boarding school where she lives. They quarrel good-naturedly, which they apparently do frequently during his visits. Meanwhile, Jasper, having an interest in the cathedral crypt, seeks the company of Durdles, a man who knows more about the crypt than anyone else.

Neville Landless and his twin sister Helena are sent to Cloisterham for their education. Neville will study with the minor canon Rev. Crisparkle; Helena will live at the Nuns’ House with Rosa. Neville confides to Rev. Crisparkle that he had hated his cruel stepfather, while Rosa confides to Helena that she loathes and fears her music-master, Jasper. Neville is immediately smitten with Rosa and is indignant that Edwin prizes his betrothal lightly. Edwin provokes him and he reacts violently, giving Jasper the opportunity to spread rumours about Neville’s having a violent temper. Rev. Crisparkle tries to reconcile Edwin and Neville, who agrees to apologise to Edwin if the former will forgive him. It is arranged that they will dine together for this purpose on Christmas Eve at Jasper’s home.

Rosa’s guardian, Mr. Grewgious, tells her that she has a substantial inheritance from her father. When she asks whether there would be any forfeiture if she did not marry Edwin, he replies that there would be none on either side. Back at his office in London, Mr. Grewgious gives Edwin a ring which Rosa’s father had given to her mother, with the proviso that Edwin must either give the ring to Rosa as a sign of his irrevocable commitment to her or return it to Mr. Grewgious. Mr. Bazzard, Mr. Grewgious’s clerk, witnesses this transaction.

Next day, Rosa and Edwin amicably agree to end their betrothal. They decide to ask Mr. Grewgious to break the news to Jasper, and Edwin intends to return the ring to Mr. Grewgious. Meanwhile, Durdles takes Jasper into the cathedral crypt. On the way there Durdles points out a mound of quicklime. Jasper provides a bottle of wine to Durdles. The wine is mysteriously potent and Durdles soon loses consciousness; while unconscious he dreams that Jasper goes off by himself in the crypt. As they return from the crypt, they encounter a boy called Deputy, and Jasper, thinking he was spying on them, takes him by the throat – but, seeing that this will strangle him, lets him go.

On Christmas Eve, Neville buys himself a heavy walking stick; he plans to spend his Christmas break hiking around the countryside. Meanwhile, Edwin visits a jeweler to repair his pocket watch; it is mentioned that the only pieces of jewelery that he wears are the watch and chain and a shirt pin. By chance he meets a woman who is an opium user from London. She asks Drood’s Christian name and he replies that it is ‘Edwin’; she says he is fortunate it is not ‘Ned,’ for ‘Ned’ is in great danger. He thinks nothing of this, for the only person who calls him ‘Ned’ is Jasper. Meanwhile, Jasper buys himself a black scarf of strong silk, which is not seen again during the course of the novel. The reconciliation dinner is successful and at midnight, Drood and Neville Landless leave together to go down to the river and look at a wind storm that rages that night.

The next morning Edwin is missing and Jasper spreads suspicion that Neville has killed him. Neville leaves early in the morning for his hike; the townspeople overtake him and forcibly bring him back to the city. Rev. Crisparkle keeps Neville out of jail by taking responsibility for him, stating that he will produce Neville anytime his presence is required. That night, Jasper is grief-stricken when Mr. Grewgious informs him that Edwin and Rosa had ended their betrothal; he reacts more strongly to this news than to the prospect that Edwin may be dead. The next morning, Rev. Crisparkle goes to the river weir and finds Edwin’s watch and chain and shirt pin.

A half-year later, Neville is living in London near Mr. Grewgious’s office. Lieutenant Tartar introduces himself and offers to share his garden with Landless; Lt. Tartar’s chambers are adjacent to Neville’s above a common courtyard. A white-haired and -whiskered stranger calling himself Dick Datchery arrives in Cloisterham. He rents a room below Jasper and observes the comings and goings in the area. On his way to the lodging the first time, Mr. Datchery asks directions from Deputy. Deputy will not go near there for fear that Jasper will choke him again.

Jasper visits Rosa at the Nuns’ House and professes his love for her. She rejects him but he persists, telling her that if she gives him no hope he will destroy Neville, the brother of her dear friend Helena. In fear of Jasper, Rosa goes to Mr. Grewgious in London.

The next day Rev. Crisparkle follows Rosa to London. When he is with Mr. Grewgious and Rosa, Lt. Tartar calls and asks if he remembers him. Rev. Crisparkle does remember him as the one who years before saved him from drowning. They do not dare let Rosa contact Neville and Helena directly, for fear that Jasper may be watching Neville, but Mr. Tartar allows Rosa to visit his chambers to contact Helena above the courtyard. Mr. Grewgious arranges for Rosa to rent a place from Mrs. Billickin and for Miss Twinkleton to live with her there so that she can live there respectably.

Jasper visits the London opium den again for the first time since Edwin’s disappearance. When he leaves at dawn, the woman who runs the opium den follows him. She vows to herself that she will not lose his trail again as she did after his last visit. This time, she follows him all the way to his home in Cloisterham; outside she meets Datchery, who tells her Jasper’s name and that he will sing the next morning in the cathedral service. On inquiry, Datchery learns she is called “Princess Puffer.” The next morning she attends the service and shakes her fists at Jasper from behind a pillar.

Dickens’s death leaves the rest of the story unknown.

My Thoughts:

I have to admit, the whole time I was reading this all I could think of was how it was unfinished and no matter how much I thought, it would never BE finished. Not a very good mindset to get as much enjoyment from the story, that’s for sure.

This was so on track for being awesome. The characters were everything I wanted in a Dickens novel. The good guys were good, the bad guy was REALLY bad and the girls were brave and fearless. The latecomers were manly and proud and I was really looking forward to seeing them developed.

This had all of the ingredients I could have asked for. Dickens just left them on the counter in the mixing bowl without cooking them. And unfortunately, it wasn’t cookie dough so I couldn’t take a chance and eat it raw.

I will say that this has gotten me interested in other authors who have tried to finish the story. If any of you have a good suggestion, please let me know.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

36 thoughts on “The Mystery of Edwin Drood ★★★★☆

    1. Oh man, that is a toughie. As I was doing this Dickens’ re-read, as I would read each book it was my favorite at the moment 😉 But I think I enjoyed Bleak House a LOT this time. Nicholas Nickleby rivaled it as did the Pickwick Papers. So I guess I’d have to choose those 3 and let them fight it out amongst themselves.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. Thanks for that. I looked it up and sadly, it’s not on kindle, paper only. So I’m going to have to think long and hard about if I want it or not.

          Might have to have a look see to see if anyone has scanned and uploaded it online.

          Like

        2. So here’s a weird story. When I initially went and searched amazon for that author/book, the search results only came up with a paper copy, hence my initial reply.

          Then I went and used google to see if it had been published anywhere in ebook. Found the publishers website, which said I could buy it for kindle. Clicked the link, which took me to the UK version of amazon. I signed in to see if I could buy it but due to damnable geo-restrictions, I couldn’t. But then it took me to the US version of amazon and there was the kindle edition. For $3. So I’m going to buy it. Can’t go wrong for $3!

          Thanks 😀

          Liked by 1 person

  1. I saw a play adaptation of this book that allowed the audience to vote on who the murderer was and on who got together at the end of the story, so there were multiple possible endings. It was a lot of fun!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nice double colon’s there 😉

      I can see a bicycle version of a light cycle in a steampunk Dickens’ish way. Or are you thinking going full throttle and just moving the whole story to the far future?

      And I’d be satisfied with that as the third Tron movie.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The Lightcycle Antics of Mr Bumblechops. Set in the same universe as Edwin Drood.Jeff Bridges as Egbert Potwalloper, who scans himself into a spinning wheel and hoopla set and has to fight for his life in an arena of virtual penny farthings.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. It was supposed to be an inside joke about raw potatoes. Back when I was getting on the Saturday comedy posts we were doing for a minute. I talked about why it’s not a good idea to eat raw potatoes. 😂 It was in reference to the raw comment about the characters not being fully “cooked”.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I skipped to your thoughts since I’m reading this. I also was skeptical about it being any good since someone else finished it. Now that I see you thought well of it, I’ll go ahead and finish it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Just to be clear, this was the incomplete version by Dickens alone. It ends like a knife chopped it 🙂

      Another commentor put me on to a completed version and I’m going to try that in a couple of months just to see. I’ve always been curious how the story could have ended.

      Like

  3. I think, this being unfinished, would keep me from trying it.

    I was the same when Sanderson took over from Robert Jordan … it just wouldn’t have sat well with me. As it turns out, I’m not a Sanderson fan, so it would have sat doubly unwell.

    Liked by 1 person

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