The Pickwick Papers ★★★★★★

pickwickpapers (Custom)This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: The Pickwick Papers
Series: ———-
Author: Charles Dickens
Rating: 6 of 5 Stars
Genre: Classic
Pages: 943
Format: Digital Edition

 

Synopsis:

Samuel Pickwick, gentleman bachelor and amateur scientist, has formed a small group of like minded men and they all decide to go exploring the Countryside of England to expand their knowledge of their Great Country.

As such, the 4 Gentlemen, Mr Pickwick, Mr Snodgrass, Mr Tuddle and Mr Tuppman, set out to see what they can see. Along the way Mr Pickwick picks up a servant by the name of Sam Weller, the company meets an honorable countryman by the name of Mr Wardle, the 2 younger gentlemen of the group fall in love and marry the niece and daughter of Mr Wardle, Mr Tuppman is disappointed in love with Mr Wardle’s spinster sister Miss Rachel. Mr Pickwick becomes embroiled in breach of promise suit with his landlady due to the machinations of the dastardly duo Dodson & Fogg, attorneys at law and ends up spending 3 months in debtors’ prison for refusing to pay the fine, as it would all go to the lawyers instead of the landlady. Pickwick and Weller have multiple runins with their lowclass counterparts, Jingle and Trotter and are made fools of several times over. Sam Weller’s father comes into the story with his own adventures of his second wife, a widow who owns a tavern and is a strict adherent to the sect of Preacher Stiggleton, who preaches teetotally while cooling drinking pineapple rum punch by the hogshead.

These are but a part of the adventures the Pickwick Club has over the course of 2 years and at the end of the book everything turns out for the best. Marriages and children abound, bad characters reform, love and generosity overcome all hardships and obstacles and Mr Pickwick retires to a city house with Sam and his wife Mary to keep him in order.

 

My Thoughts:

First off, yes, I did give this 6 stars. I know circumstances played a part, ie, several dnf’s had my reading expectations abysmally low. But even without that, this was just a fantastic book.

It started a little rough and in a rather formal vein but that was for the first chapter only. Then it turned into Dickens’ more relatable style. I’m a Dickens’ fan through and through.

This was an interesting little plot-less book. I say little because even though the “official” page count is over 900 pages, when I used Calibre’s page count plugin, this was barely over 600 pages. I suspect the pictures and chapters each had their own breaks which artificially inflated the page count.

I think humor was the most prevalent of the emotions that Dickens was trying to call forth and my goodness, he did a grand job. Sam Weller, Pickwick’s man servant was a font of pugnacious, pugalistic one liners and retorts that had me in stitches. He was also a bit more knowledgeable about the world at large than his master and thus was able to guide him safely through some troubled waters.

Romance, pathos, politics, social justice’ing of the day (Dickens was dead set against the whole idea of Debtors Prison. But to be fair, he actually had solid reasons, not just vapid, idiotic, baseless, pointless and generally useless ideas like the sjw’s of today), hijinks and lots and lots of drinking.

Through it all, Pickwick navigates the adventures as best he can and we can cheer him on, groan with him, laugh with him (and Sam Weller) and generally love every second spent reading this book. I’m also giving this the Best Book of the Year tag.

★★★★★★

 

bookstooge (Custom)

 

 

13 thoughts on “The Pickwick Papers ★★★★★★

  1. HCNewton says:

    First Dickens I read (post-abridgements for children, anyway). You liked it more than I did, but I did enjoy it. I remember taking a day off school my senior year, and read it in a day… Not a recommended way to consume it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. pcbushi says:

    I blogged a while ago about a story from the Pickwick Papers, about a gravedigger and some goblins. It reminded me of the kind of thing Dunsany might have written. Wouldn’t surprise me at all if he were inspired by some of Dickens’ work.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You weren’t kidding that Dickens was going to save the day. I’ve never heard of this title in particular, but it does sound like it has all the right ingredients for a complete reading experience.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Midu Hadi says:

    One of my favorites too. It is funny how I used to think 900 pages made it a big book lol

    Liked by 1 person

  5. […] The Pickwick Papers – 6 Stars (Perfect in Every Way) […]

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  6. Awesome! It wasn’t quite as impressed as you but I certainly enjoyed my read of this book. I’m reading Bleak House right now and quite enjoying it; it has a mystery-quality that I haven’t quite experienced with Dickens yet. I think this experience tells you that you have to read more classics! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bookstooge says:

      Part of me being so impressed was a couple of lowstar books read right before it. Nothing improves a book more than a couple of stinkers 🙂

      Indeed, this IS why I am re-reading all of Dickens’ works (well, most of it. Travelogues can take a flying leap). The man was a genius 🙂

      Like

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