Batman: Under the Red Hood (Batman/Robin #5) ★★★☆☆

undertheredhood (Custom)This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: Batman: Under the Red Hood
Series: Batman/Robin #5
Author: Judd Winick
Artist: Doug Mahnke
Rating: 3 of 5 Stars
Genre: Comics
Pages: 384
Format: Paper Edition

 

 

Synopsis:

A vigilante, wearing a Red Hood, begins taking out various crime syndicates in Gotham. Unfortunately, he’s just as willing to kill as the badguys. This brings him to Batman’s attention but he’s able to outwit Batman. It is revealed, quite early on I might add, that the Red Hood is Jason Todd and he’s back for revenge against the Joker and to show Batman that his scruples against killing just won’t work anymore. That story ends with Batman, Red Hood and the Joker all facing off against each other and the Joker stabbing a huge block of c4 and blowing the building to kingdom come.

The book ends with a 2part storyline about how Todd came back to life. Apparantly some of the shenanigans pulled by DC with Superman allowed “time changes” and such baloney and so Todd was miraculously alive. He was then put in a Lazarus Pit by Talia Al’Ghul and sent on his way to revenge himself.

 

My Thoughts:

This book had some really deep moments, like where Todd’s philosophy of death is pitted against Batman’s and then some just plain stupid points, like the end story about how Todd came back to life.

This book explores why Batman is one of the good guys. It isn’t just that he doesn’t kill but the whole reasoning behind it. Batman still believes in the Justice System. He believes in the duly constituted authority of the police and the like. He apprehends the criminals because somebody needs to and provides evidence against them but he realizes that he is NOT judge, jury and executioner. He is not above the Law even while working outside the framework of the law. Ultimately, he serves the purposes of Law.

Todd, on the other hand, is just as much a piece of trash as he was back in “Death in the Family”. He’s an arrogant, pompous and now, truly dangerous psychopath. He doesn’t believe in the underpinnings of Law and Order and hence, has absolutely no regard for even trying to play by the rules. At times I found myself almost agreeing with his assessment of how Batman’s way doesn’t seem to work. His accusations against the Joker, about the thousands he has killed, the thousands that could have been saved if Batman had only killed the Joker, rang true in my ears. Until I stopped and thought. I do believe that the Joker should have been killed but not by Batman. He should have been executed by the Government for his crimes. And that is what is so seductive about these comics. They provide half truths as full truths. They purport to show that ANY killing is somehow bad. So only badguys do the killing and goodguys don’t kill, including the Government. Even though death is sometimes the only punishment that fits the crime.

However, that gets into the whole role of government and ethics and where you get your ideas from. That is a MUCH deeper and more complicated issue than can be adequately done justice to in a comic book. Plus, it doesn’t help that a lot of comic people are leftist commie pinkos who are as deluded as Hitler ever was so to ever expect something right and decent from them is like expecting me to start reading those bodice ripper books and think they’re great literature. It just isn’t going to happen.

The thing that really knocked this down for me was the whole explanation for how Todd came back. It had something to do with the Flashpoint storyline or the New52 or something. I got a 2page spread showing a Superman who looked like he was 18, breaking something or other and somehow that all mystically made it happen. I HATE SuperKid. The New52 Superkid needed his bottom paddled and told to grow up. He’s called phracking Super MAN for a reason so make him look like a man. And make him somebody kids want to emulate and look up to, not a teen displacement fantasy. There are enough superheroes who already do that * frowny face *

Also, there was zero mention of Tim Drake. Near the beginning there is a brief mention of some girl who also died who was close to being a fourth Robin, but nary hide nor hair of Tim Drake. I had to go to Wikipedia to see a history of Tim and found out he was branching out into the Red Robin character at this point. But Nightwing got facetime in this book and even had his city blown up, so why Drake wasn’t included is beyond me. Bunch of Jealous Haters is my guess.

Overall, I am pretty pleased with this Robinverse read. From the death of Jason Todd to his return, I think these 4 Robin related graphic novels are all worth owning. While they are a bit topsy turvy due to DC doing reboots every decade or less, you learn a lot about the Robin personna and get various takes on it. That being said, I will not be hunting down any of the Red Robin graphic novels or continuing any of the storylines left open in this book. I’ve got a Superman graphic novel still on tap but I think I’m going to wait a month or two before diving into it.

My rating of this book went all over the place from 2 stars to 4 star and even while writing this review I found myself going back and forth. So I settled on a 3star, as it means I was ok with the read but wasn’t wow’d.

★★★☆☆

bookstooge

 

 

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18 thoughts on “Batman: Under the Red Hood (Batman/Robin #5) ★★★☆☆

  1. savageddt says:

    I never knew about Tod untill i had to google him.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joelendil says:

    I agree on your view that Joker should die but only by lawful government execution…it has sound biblical theology behind it (Genesis 9:5-6, Romans 13:1-5), but, as you said, can’t expect that out of a comic book.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Tyson Adams says:

    I’m not a fan of capital punishment even for The Joker. But have to question how he manages to keep escaping Arkham. At this stage you’d almost think it was because Batman was letting him out when he got bored – or DC needed to sell more copies this run.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bookstooge says:

      It’s definitely a thing of convenience. It started out as a way to show just how much of a genius the joker was, that no walls could hold him. But it has devolved into a holding pen until he’s needed…

      Liked by 1 person

  4. “Until I stopped and thought. I do believe that the Joker should have been killed but not by Batman. He should have been executed by the Government for his crimes. And that is what is so seductive about these comics. They provide half truths as full truths. They purport to show that ANY killing is somehow bad. So only badguys do the killing and goodguys don’t kill, including the Government. Even though death is sometimes the only punishment that fits the crime.”

    YES!!! Yes, yes, yes!!! I agree with you here AND about the writers being lefty commies etc. I have been saying the same (though less pointed) things about the current Marvel crop of writers since I started my blog and it is SO UNBELIEVABLY GREAT to hear someone else say it! THAN YOU, you made my day with this post!!! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bookstooge says:

      You are welcome.

      I have often wondered if the artsy people are attracted to things like The Left because they’re incredibly naive and idealistic or if there actually is a movement to suppress the non-accepted actors/writers/authors, etc by the Powerful Money Leftists who control Big Entertainment.

      Personally, I don’t think they’re all that naive and idealistic…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, I’m sure we could find a handful of “artists” who are naive and idealistic enough to fall for the Leftist claptrap. But I’m also sure they are the minority; the rest have decided this is the best way to gain power over everyone, since control of entertainment is almost equivalent to mind control. It won’t work on everyone all the time, but while it works it will do a hell of a lot of damage.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. “it doesn’t help that a lot of comic people are leftist commie pinkos who are as deluded as Hitler ever was so to ever expect something right and decent from them is like expecting me to start reading those bodice ripper books and think they’re great literature”- haha oh gosh this a little too true. And I’m just a bit fed up with stories in general where “all killing is bad” (I’ve even seen tv shows that make killing *in self defence* bad- I mean, sure, that’s fine if you’ve got a death wish I guess)

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Hahahah that ending was insanely out of place, and I totally feel how your rating fluctuated from 2 to 4 throughout the story. It could have easily have been an amazing story if it was a bit more condensed. Which is why the animated movie was so good (do you plan on checking that out some day?).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bookstooge says:

      I don’t think so. For whatever reason, even though I’ve heard really good things about DC’s animated movies, I have no desire to seek them out.
      Now, maybe if a bunch showed up on Prime, I’d watch them as background while writing posts or responding to comments, etc. But that would be about the only way.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. […] up the Robinverse series of graphic novels I was reading with Under the Red Hood. This burned me out on graphic novels for a bit, so I don’t know when I’ll read […]

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  8. Chris Cooke says:

    Ah…Superboy Prime punching through reality and bringing back Jason Todd – much like the Joker being all “I’m the ambassador to Iran and have diplomatic immunity!” – is something that screams “comics” (and I say that as someone who loves that medium). There was a great straight to dvd adaptation called Batman: Under the Red Hood that you might enjoy, and it had a better way that Todd was brough back.

    Liked by 1 person

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